International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI)

Original Editor - Daphne Jackson.

Top Contributors - Daphne Jackson and Naomi O'Reilly  

Overview

The International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) were developed by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) as a universal classification tool for spinal cord injury (SCI). The most recently revised edition was published in 2011[1].

The classification tool involves a sensory and motor examination to determine the neurological level of the injury and whether the injury is complete or incomplete. The ISNCSCI defines neurological level as the most caudal level at which sensory and motor function are intact[1]. The completeness of the injury is graded according to the ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS):

A = Complete. No sensory or motor function is preserved in the sacral segments S4-S5.
B = Sensory Incomplete. Sensory but not motor function is preserved below the neurological level and includes the sacral segments S4-S5, AND no motor function is preserved more than three levels below the motor level on either side of the body.
C = Motor Incomplete. Motor function is preserved below the neurological level, and more than half of key muscle functions below the single neurological level of injury have a muscle grade less than 3 (Grades 0-2).
D = Motor Incomplete. Motor function is preserved below the neurological level, and at least half (half or more) of key muscle functions below the NLI have a muscle grade ≥ 3.
E = Normal. If sensation and motor function as tested with the ISNCSCI are graded as normal in all segments, and the patient had prior deficits, then the AIS grade is E. Someone without a SCI does not receive an AIS grade.

ASIA Exam Worksheet

Neurologic Assessment

Sensory Examination A key point in each of the 28 dermatomes (from C2-S4-5) is tested bilaterally using light touch and pin-prick (sharp-dull discrimination)[1]. Equipment common to clinical settings, such as a cotton wisp and safety pin, may be used. Appreciation of sensation is tested in comparison to sensation on the patient’s cheek. A three-point scale is used for scoring:
0 = absent
1 = altered (impaired or partial appreciation, including hyperesthesia)
2 = normal or intact (similar as on the cheek)
NT = not testable

Deep anal pressure (formerly deep anal sensation): A gentle pressure is applied to the anorectal wall by the examiner’s fnger[1]. Perceived pressure is graded as absent or present.

Motor Examination Key muscle functions of the myotomes C5-T1 and L2-S1 are tested bilaterally[1]. A six-point scale is used for scoring:
0 = total paralysis
1 = palpable or visible contraction
2 = active movement, full range of motion (ROM) with gravity eliminated
3 = active movement, full ROM against gravity
4 = active movement, full ROM against gravity and moderate resistance in a muscle specific position
5 = (normal) active movement, full ROM against gravity and full resistance in a muscle specific position expected from an otherwise unimpaired person
5* = (normal) active movement, full ROM against gravity and sufficient resistance to be considered normal if identified inhibiting factors (i.e., pain, disuse) were not present
NT = not testable (i.e., due to immobilization, severe pain such that the patient cannot be graded, amputation of limb, or contracture of >50% of the range of motion)

Voluntary anal contraction: The patient is asked to voluntarily contract the external anal sphincter around the examiner’s finger[1]. The contraction is scored as absent or present.

[2]

Determination of Neurological Level of Injury

The neurological level of injury is determined by identifying the most caudal segment of the cord with both intact sensation and normal antigravity muscle function strength. The sensory level refers to the most caudal, intact dermatome for both light touch and pin-prick sensation (score=2). The motor level refers to the most caudal myotome with a key muscle function of at least grade 3. If there is a discrepancy between the most caudal intact section between the four possible levels of right sensory level, left sensory level, right motor level, or left motor level, the neurological level of injury is considered the most rostral segment of these four levels[1].

Zone of Partial Preservation

In complete injuries (AIS A), the zone of partial preservation refers to dermatomes and myotomes caudal to the sensory or motor level that remains partially innervated[1].

Functional Tests

The ISNCSCI measures neurological status in order to describe a patient’s level of impairment. Functional tests are not included in the ISNCSCI examination. However, functional outcomes are necessary for understanding the functional consequences of the level of impairment[3].
Functional tests that the clinician may consider include:

  • 6-minute walk test (6MWT)
  • 10-meter walk test (10MWT)
  • Berg Balance Scale
  • Walking index for spinal cord injury (WISCI II)
  • Spinal cord injury functional ambulation inventory (SCI-FAI)
  • Timed Up and Go Test (TUG)
  • Graded redefined assessment of strength sensibility and prehension (GRASSP)
  • Modified functional reach test (mFRT)
  • Spinal cord independence measure, version III (SCIM-III)
  • Quadriplegia index of function (QIF)

Evidence

Reliability

The ISNCSCI sensory and motor examinations are reliable when conducted by a trained examiner[4]. Formal training in the administration of the ISNCSCI standards has been shown to improve the accuracy of the examiner’s classification[5].

Validity

The ISNCSCI are validated for injury classification[6].

Construct validity of the ASIA motor score as a measure of recovery following SCI and as an outcome measure for clinical trials is greater when upper and lower extremity motor scales are scored independently and not summated together[6].

Recent Related Research (from Pubmed)

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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 Burns S, Biering-Sørensen F, Donovan W, Graves D, Jha A, Johansen M, Jones L, Krassioukov A, Kirshblum, Mulcahey MJ, Schmidt Read M, Waring W. International standards for neurological classification of spinal cord injury, revised 2011. Top Spinal Cord Inj Rehabil 2012;18(1):85-99.
  2. Kaplan M. Kaplan - ASIA assessment. Available from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IP_wunjn9Io [last accessed 13 October 2013]
  3. Kalsi-Ryan S, Wilson J, Yang JM, Fehlings MG. Neurological grading in traumatic spinal cord injury. World Neurosurg 2013. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2013.01.007 (accessed 13 October 2013).
  4. Marino R, Jones L, Kirshblum S, Tal J, Dasgupta A. Reliability and repeatability of the motor and sensory examination of the international standards for neurological classification of spinal cord injury. J Spinal Cord Med 2008;31(2)166-170.
  5. Schuld C, Wiese J, Franz S, Putz C, Stierle I, Smoor I, Weidner N, EMSCI Study Group, Rupp RR. Effect of formal training in scaling, scoring and classification of the international standards for neurological classification of spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord 2013;51(4):282-8.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Graves D, Frankiewicz RG, Donovan WH. Construct validity and dimensional structure of the ASIA motor scale. J Spinal Cord Med 2006;29(1):39-45.