Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test

Original Editor - Joseph Ayotunde Aderonmu

Top Contributors - Joseph Ayotunde Aderonmu and Shaimaa Eldib  

Introduction

The Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test (JTHFT) is a standardized and objective measure of fine and gross motor hand function using simulated activities of daily living (ADL). [1][2] The JTHFT has seven subsets which are writing, simulated page-turning, lifting small objects, simulated feeding, stacking, and lifting large, lightweight, and heavy objects. [1] JTHFT finds easy applicability in clinical settings since it can be administered in a short time by using readily available materials. [3]

Intended Population

A number of studies report that the JTHFT is a valid assessment tool for the measurement of hand dysfunctions from a variety of patient populations.[4][5][6][7] The JTHFT has been widely used in the clinical and research settings as well as in different patient populations such as those with

Method of Use

To evaluate hand function using the JTHFT, each of its subset is timed and can be compared with the established norms. [1] The JTHFT includes a series of seven subtests representing fine motor, nonweighted and weighted hand function in ADL, which includes:

  1. Printing a 24-letter, third-grade reading difficulty sentence
  2. Turning over 7.6×12.7 cm (3×5-inch) cards (simulated page turning)
  3. Picking up small, common objects (e.g. pennies, paper clips, bottle caps) and placing them in a container
  4. Stacking checkers (test of eye-hand co-ordination)
  5. Simulated feeding
  6. Moving large empty cans
  7. Moving large weighted [0.45 kg (l lb)] cans.

The subtests are scored by recording the number of seconds required to complete each test.

Time Required

Length: 15-45 minutes to complete the JTHFT.

Scoring

Total score is the sum of time taken for each sub-test, which are rounded to the nearest second. Shorter times indicate better performance.

Equipment

  • Stopwatch
  • Chair (18” seat height)
  • Desk/table (30” high)
  • 4 sheets of unruled white paper
  • Clipboard -Sentences typed in upper case centered on a 5x8” index card on a bookstand
  • 5 index cards (ruled on one side only)
  • Empty 1 pound coffee can
  • 2 paper clips
  • 2 regular sized bottle caps
  • 2 U.S. pennies
  • 5 kidney beans (~5/8” long)
  • 1 regular teaspoon
  • Wooden board (41 ½” long, 11 ¼” wide, ¾” thick)
  • “C” clamp -Plywood (20” long, 2” wide, ½” thick) glued to the board
  • 4 standard size (1 ¼” diameter) red wooden checkers
  • 5 No. 303 cans

A test kit can be obtained which includes all instructions, items required for all sub-tests, a carrying bag, and blank record forms.

Procedure

A detailed procedure of the JTHFT is available in this document.

Evidence

Studies have shown that the JTHFT is a valid assessment tool for the measurement of hand dysfunction from a variety of patient populations.[4][5][6][7] Test–retest reliability was established from the original JTHFT, wherein results were found to be fairly to moderately consistent over time.[2] Several studies also demonstrated that the JTHFT had moderate to high test–retest reliability and excellent intrarater reliability (r=0.84 and 0.85, P<0.05) with absent practice effect (P<0.05).[2]

Additional Optional Modules

Because the writing subset of the JTHFT can be affected by hand dominance, modifications of the JTHFT have been described. Administering the remaining 6 sub-tests has been reported to have strong enough correlation with activities of daily living and deformity to maintain the validity of the modified JTHFT. [14]

Resources

[15]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Jebsen R, Taylor N, Trieschmann R, Trotter M, Howard L. An objective and standardized test of hand function. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1969; 50:311–319.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Takla MK, Mahmoud EA, Abd El-Latif N. Jebsen Taylor Hand Function test: Gender, dominance, and age differences in healthy Egyptian population. Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy. 2018 Jul 1;23(2):85.
  3. Sears E, Chung K. Validity and responsiveness of the Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test. J Hand Surg Am 2010; 35:30–37.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Bovend’Eerdt H, Dawes H, Johansen-Berg H, Wade T. Evaluation of the Modified Jebsen Test of Hand Function and the University of Maryland Arm Questionnaire for Stroke. Clin Rehabil 2004; 18:195–202
  5. 5.0 5.1 Feys P, Duportail M, Kos D, van Asch P, Ketelaer P. Validity of the TEMPA for the measurement of upper limb function in multiple sclerosis. Clin Rehabil 2002; 16:166–173.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Vliet Vieland TP, van der Wijk TP, Jolie IM, Zwinderman AH. Determinants of hand function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. J Rheumatol 1996;23:835–840.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Sharma S, Schumacher HR, McLellan AT. Evaluation of the Jebsen Hand Function Test for use in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis Care Res 1994; 7:16–19.
  8. Beekhuizen S, Field-Fote C. Massed practice versus massed practice with stimulation: effects on upper extremity function and cortical plasticity in individuals with incomplete cervical spinal cord injury. Neurorehabil Neural Repair 2005; 19:33–45
  9. Alon G, Sunnerhagen S, Geurts H, Ohry A. A home-based, selfadministered stimulation program to improve selected hand functions of chronic stroke. NeuroRehabilitation 2003; 18:215–225
  10. Charles R, Wolf L, Schneider A, Gordon M. Efficacy of a child-friendly form of constraint-induced movement therapy in hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a randomized control trial. Dev Med Child Neurol 2006; 48:635–642.
  11. Feys P, Duportail M, Kos D, van Asch P, Ketelaer P. Validity of the TEMPA for the measurement of upper limb function in multiple sclerosis. Clin Rehabil 2002; 16:166–173.
  12. Kreder J, Agel J, McKee D, Schemitsch H, Stephen D, Hanel P. A randomized, controlled trial of distal radius fractures with metaphyseal displacement but without joint incongruity: closed reduction and casting versus closed reduction, spanning external fixation, and optional percutaneous K-wires. J Orthop Trauma 2006; 20:115–121.
  13. Rettig A, Luca L, Murphy S. Silicone implant arthroplasty in patients with idiopathic osteoarthritis of the metacarpophalangeal joint. J Hand Surg Am 2005; 30:667–672
  14. Davis Sears E, Chung KC. Validity and responsiveness of the Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test. J Hand Surg Am 2010;35(1):30–7
  15. Jebsen Taylor Hand Function Test, Jennifer Nichole.