Massachusetts

United States Physical Therapy Practice Acts

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Temporary License Requirements/Availability

A person who meets the qualifications to be admitted to the examination for licensure as physical therapist may between the date of filing an application for licensure and the announcement of the results of the next succeeding examination for licensure practice as a physical therapist under direction of a physical therapist duly licensed under this chapter. If any person so practicing fails to qualify for or pass the first announced examination after filing for licensure, all privileges under this section shall automatically cease upon due notice to the applicant of such failure. Such privileges shall be renewed upon filing for a second examination for licensure and shall automatically cease upon notice to the applicant that he has failed to pass the second examination. Such privileges may again be renewed upon the applicant petitioning the board for permission to file a third application and said permission being granted by the board, and shall automatically cease upon due notice that he has failed to pass the third examination. The privilege shall not exceed beyond the third examination.[1]

Requirements for License

An applicant who furnished satisfactory proof that he is of good moral character and that he has met the educational and clinical practice requirements set forth in section twenty-three F, twenty-three G, twenty-three H, twenty-three I, or twenty-three J, shall, upon payment of a fee determined by the secretary of administration and finance, be examined by the board, and if found qualified, and if he passes the examination, shall be licensed to practice.[1]

An applicant for licensure as a physical therapist shall:
(a) be a graduate of a three or four year secondary school or has passed a high school equivalency test deemed acceptable by the board,
(b) be a graduate of an accredited educational program leading to professional qualification in physical therapy and approved by the board,
(c) or have graduated from an educational program in physical therapy chartered in a sovereign state outside the United States and have furnished to the board such evidence as it may require: (1) that his education is substantially the equivalent of that of graduates of approved programs in the United States, and (2) that he has sufficient qualifications, including the proficiency in the English language, to practice physical therapy,
(d) have passed an examination administered by the board. Such examination shall be written, and may, at the discretion of the board, in addition, be oral and demonstrative, and shall test the applicant’s knowledge of the basic and clinical sciences as they relate to physical therapy, including the applicant’s professional skills and judgment in the utilization of physical therapy techniques and methods, and other subjects as the board may deem useful to determine the applicant’s fitness to act as a physical therapist. The examination shall be conducted by the board at least twice each year and at times and places to be determined by the board.[2]

Licenses shall expire every 2 years on the birth anniversary of the licensee. Licensees shall pay to the board a renewal fee determined by the secretary of administration and finance. The board may require specific continuing education as a condition of license renewal.[1]

The board may without examination, license a physical therapist or physical therapist assistant who is duly licensed or registered under the laws of another state or territory of the United States, the District of Columbia, or the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. At the time of making such application, the applicant shall pay a fee determined by the secretary of administration and finance to the board.[1]

Supervision

Physical Therapy Students

Continued Competence

The board may require specific continuing education as a condition of license renewal.[1]

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A physical therapist or physical therapist assistant whose license, certificate, registration or authority relating to the practice is suspended for more than 1 year for professional misconduct with regard to insurance claims shall not own, operate, practice in, or be employed by any chiropractic or physical therapy office, clinic, or other place designated to the practice of chiropractic or physical therapy until the license is reinstated by the board.
A physical therapist or physical therapist assistant whose license, certificate, registration or authority relating to the practice is suspended for a second offense with regard to insurance claims shall have his license permanently revoked.[1]

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References

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  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 The Commonwealth of Massachusetts. General Laws. www.malegislature.gov (acessed 20 April 2012).
  2. Laws

Disclaimer:   Informational Content is assimilated from the state practice act is a resource only and should not be considered a  substitute for the content within the state practice act.  All state practice acts can change and it is recommended that you refer to the original resource in the link above.