Pediatric Balance Scale

Original Editor - Meaghan Rieke


Top Contributors - Meaghan Rieke

Objective

The Pediatric Balance Scale is a modified version of the Berg Balance Scale that is used to assess functional balance skills in school-aged children. The scale consists of 14 items that are scored from 0 points (lowest function) to 4 points (highest function) with a maximum score of 56 points.[1]

Intended Population

The Pediatric Balance Scale is intended for use with school-aged children with mild to moderate motor impairments. Pilot testing was performed on children aged 5 to 15 years.[1]

Method of Use

Equipment[1]

  • Adjustable height bench
  • Chair with back support and arm rests
  • Stopwatch or watch with a second hand
  • Masking tape (1 inch wide)
  • Step stool 6 inches in height
  • Chalkboard eraser
  • Ruler or yardstick
  • Small level

Optional equipment that may be helpful includes: 2 child size footprints, blindfold, brightly colored object at least 2 inches in size, flash cards, 2 inches of adhesive-backed hook Velcro, two 1 foot strips of loop Velcro.

Item Descriptions[1]

  1. Sitting to standing
  2. Standing to sitting
  3. Transfers
  4. Standing unsupported
  5. Sitting unsupported
  6. Standing with eyes closed
  7. Standing with feet together
  8. Standing with one foot in front
  9. Standing on one foot
  10. Turning 360 degrees
  11. Turning to look behind
  12. Retrieving object from floor
  13. Placing alternate foot on stool
  14. Reaching forward with outstretched arm

Evidence

Reliability

Reliability testing performed with a sample of 20 children ages 5-15 years old with mild to moderate motor impairments showed good test-retest reliability (ICC=0.998) and good interrater reliability (ICC=0.997).[1]

Validity

Validity testing performed with a sample of 30 children ages 4-10 years old with spastic cerebral palsy in GMFCS Levels I-III showed a strong correlation between the Pediatric Balance Scale and the self-care (r=0.73, p<0.001) and mobility (r=0.82, p<0.001) dimensions of the Pediatric Disability Evaluation Inventory (PEDI).[2]

Validity testing performed with a sample of 23 children ages 6-15 years old with spastic cerebral palsy (hemiplegia or diplegia) showed a strong correlation (r=0.797, p<0.05) between the Pediatric Balance Scale and the Selective Control Assessment of Lower Extremity (Scale).[3]

Links

General instructions, equipment list, and scoring criteria are available at this link: Pediatric Balance Scale.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Franjoine MR, Gunther JS, Taylor MJ. Pediatric balance scale: a modified version of the berg balance scale for the school-age child with mild to moderate motor impairment. Pediatr Phys Ther 2003;15(2):114-28.
  2. Duarte Nde A, Grecco LA, Franco RC, Zanon N, Oliveira CS. Correlation between pediatric balance scale and functional test in children with cerebral palsy. J Phys Ther Sci 2014;26(6):849-53.
  3. Lim H. Correlation between the selective control assessment of lower extremity and pediatric balance scale scores in children with spastic cerebral palsy. J Phys Ther Sci 2015;27(12):3645-49.