Crank Test

Original Editor - Stacy S Stone

Top Contributors - Stacy S Stone, Rachael Lowe, Scott Buxton, Dan Rhon and Laura Ritchie

Purpose

This test is used to identify glenoid labral tears.

Technique

[1]

Patient is upright with the arm elevated to 160° in the scapular plane. Joint load is applied along the axis of the humerus with one hand while the other hand performs humeral rotation. The test can be repeated in supine. A positive test is indicated during the maneuver (usually during external rotation) if there is reproduction of symptoms with or without a click. [2]

Evidence

First author
Sensitivity (95% CI)
Specificity (95% CI)
+LR (95% CI)
-LR (95% CI)
Accuracy (%)
Guanche 2003 0.4 0.73 1.481 0.821
Liu 1996 0.906 (0.750–0.980) 0.933 (0.779–0.992) 13.594 (3.547–52.099) 0.100 (0.034–0.296) 91.9
Mimori 1999 0.833 (0.516–0.979) 1.000 (0.292–1.000) 6.462 (0.477–87.549) 0.220 (0.068–0.711) 86.6
Myers 2005 0.346 0.7 Not calculated Not calculated 44.4
Nakagawa 2005 0.58 0.72 Not calculated Not calculated 66
Parentis 2006 0.087 0.826 Not calculated Not calculated
Stetson and Templin 2002 0.462 (0.266–0.666) 0.564 (0.396–0.722) 1.059 (0.612–1.831) 0.955 (0.608–1.497) 33.8

[2]

Resources

  • Guanche CA, Jones DC. Clinical testing for tears of the glenoid labrum. Arthroscopy. 2003;19:517-523.
  • Liu SH, Henry MH, Nuccion S, Shapiro MS, Dorey F. Diagnosis of glenoid labral tears: a comparison between magnetic resonance imaging and clinical examinations. Am J Sports Med. 1996;24(2):149–154.

References

  1. Physiotutors. Crank Test | SLAP Lesions. Available from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HTpejI3FGG4
  2. 2.0 2.1 Munro W, Healy R. The validity and accuracy of clinical tests used to detect labral pathology of the shoulder-a systematic review. Manual Therapy 2009; 14(2):119-30.