Feiss Line Test

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Introduction

The feiss line is a line that is drawn and extends from the first metatarsophalangeal joint, goes over the navicular tubercle up to the apex of the medial malleolus. It may be defined as an imaginary line that extends straight from the medial malleolus through the navicular bone to the centre of the head of the first metatarsal[1]. Alterations in the angulation created by the line either before or during weight bearing is indicative of excessive pronation of the foot. The foot is considered hyperpronated when feiss angle is between 30° and 90° while the foot is bearing weight[2]. Its purpose is to determine the position of the navicular tubercle and assess the longitudinal arch of the foot.

Description

The examiner requires a marker and straight line rule. With the marker, marks are made on the medial malleolus, the navicular tubercle and the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint. A straight line that connects the marks is then drawn from the medial malleolus to the MTP.

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Results

Possible results that can be deduced:

  • If the line drawn intersects with the navicular tubercle indicates a normal foot
  • Pes planus is indicative if Feiss line runs below the tubercle
  • When line runs above the tubercle, pes cavus is indicated[4]

Resources

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References

  1. Hannigan-Downs K, Harter R, Smith G. Radiographic validation and reliability of selected clinical measures of pronation. J Ath Tr 2000; 35:12-30.
  2. Medical Dictionary, 2009 Farlex and Partners. Available from: https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Feiss+line (accessed 27 February 2021).
  3. Jack Elliott-Gower. Feiss Line Test. Available from: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2kd6Z-nTiKc [last accessed 3/3/2021
  4. Course Hero- Homework Help. Feiss line test purpose of test structures being. Available from: https://www.coursehero.com/file/p5k7qo8/Feiss-line-test-Purpose-of-Test-structures-being-tested-test-position-of/ (accessed 3 March 2021).