Golfer’s Elbow Test

Original Editor - Tyler Schultz


Purpose

The purpose of the Medial Epicondylitis (Golfers Elbow) Test is to screen the patient for medial epicondylalgia or "golfers elbow".

Clinical examination

Medial Epicondylitis.jpeg

Findings on clinical examination include tenderness over the medial epicondyle and common flexor muscle origin. Pain may indicate medial epicondylitis/golfers elbow.[1] In addition to tenderness, provocative special test is employed to assess for medial epicondylitis. 

Technique

Passive Technique

Position: The patient can be seated or standing for this test.

Procedure: The therapist palpates the medial epicondyle and supports the elbow with one hand, while the other hand passivelly supinates the patients forearm and fully extends the elbow, wrist and fingers.[2][3] 

Interpretation: If sudden pain or discomfort is reproduced along the medial aspect of the elbow in the region of the medial epicondyle, then this test is considered positive.

Active Technique

Position: The patient seated for this test.

Procedure: Patient flex the elbow, turns the hand palm up (forearm supination). The examiner then grasps the patient’s wrist and elbow and attempts to straighten out the elbow (forced extension) against the patient’s resistance (resisted elbow-wrist flexion). [5] 

Interpretation: If sudden pain or discomfort is reproduced along the medial aspect of the elbow in the region of the medial epicondyle, then this test is considered positive.

Evidence

No studies on diagnostic accuracy for medial epicondylitis test were found.

Resources

Others tests to examine golfer's elbow:

References

  1. Copas, D.,Talbot, J. C. Clinical assessment of the elbow. J Orthop Trauma., 2016; 30(4): 291-300.
  2. Dutton, M. Orthopaedic: Examination, evaluation, and intervention. 2nd ed. New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc, 2008.
  3. Magee, D. J. Orthopedic Physical Assesment E-book. 6th ed. Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014.
  4. Physiotutors. Medial Epicondylitis Test⎟"Golfer's Elbow". Available from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u5H9iG8QhYA [last accessed 23/6/2018]
  5. Polkinghorn, B. S. A novel method for assessing elbow pain resulting from epicondylitis. J Chiropr Med, 2002; 1(3):117-121.